Artist’s Statement

My primary interest in creating prints is to work with shape and colour. My subject matter is the rural landscape around me and, while I make observational drawings and photograph in the landscape, the design drawings that result in prints are very much my own creation in the studio. I am not particularly interested in producing an accurate reproduction of a specific site. I prefer to try and evoke a sense of place that is less about geography and more about mood and my chief ambition is provide enough space and ambiguity for the viewer to make the landscape their own. It is for that reason that I try never to add buildings or figures to work: preferring to leave the print empty ready for the viewer.

Unless I am working on a public art project, I work only in linocut or Japanese watercolour woodblock. I constantly strive to push these two processes in new directions, always manipulating the techniques to suit the images I intend to create rather than fitting my ideas into the demands of the print process. My two residencies in Japan to study the traditional methods of Edo Period Japanese woodblock printmaking have had a profound effect on my work, both visually and in disciplining my approach to printmaking. I am currently experimenting in linocut with many layered prints using transparent colours to catch a more immediate and painterly feel. I am also working on a small series of entirely traditional Japanese prints, cut into cherry, cutting a fine detail line or key block and producing the blocks and prints exclusively by Edo period methods.